Rob and Cronenberg’s Interview with ‘The Boston Globe’

Rob and Cronenberg talk to ‘The Boston Globe’ about adapting the novel, Cosmopolis, to the big screen and the experience they shared while ringing the opening bell for the New York Stock Exchange.

One of the most difficult tasks for Cronenberg was translating the intricate dialogue from the novel to the silver screen. In order to keep the flavor of the book in tact, Cronenberg maintained the poeticism. When asked about whether Cronenberg and Rob had a better understanding of the story now that they’ve finished filming, they both respond with saying that they are still learning new themes and interpretations:

Pattinson: Well, I like it. I don’t think that confusion is necessarily a bad thing. We’ve done hundreds of interviews now and I still find myself coming up with new things to say.

Cronenberg: Those statements that we made, which were very candid, can be misinterpreted as meaning we were inept, incompetent. But not at all. You know, I don’t do storyboards, for example. I don’t really know what I’m going to do at every set up and every shot. It’s all very spontaneous and of-the-moment, even what lens to use. That’s what we’re talking about. We don’t have it all mapped out. We’re trusting the script and trusting the dialogue that is all 100 percent Don DeLillo’s and taken from the novel directly. We know that if we respond directly to that . . . the movie will have its coherence.

Further in the interview, Rob and Cronenberg are asked to share their experiences from ringing the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange:

Cronenberg: All through the halls of the stock exchange they have these monitors built into the walls, and they were all showing clips of “Cosmopolis.” All of the people there who were marshaling us were incredibly excited about the movie and really wanted to see it. And they were incredibly friendly and sweet, and I was suddenly thinking, “This is the wonderful, friendly face of capitalism. I don’t know why I’ve been fighting it for so long. I think I’m going to buy some stock.” [Pattinson laughs.] And the stock exchange is about marketing. To link the starting of the day with some product that’s being marketed was a no-brainer. And the fact that it might be rather ironic that we were opening the stock exchange; I don’t think it occurred to them.

Pattinson: I’m so clueless about anything to do with that world. I was kind of just terrified that I was somehow going to mess it up. And also to see people’s enthusiasm. It’s so alien. Even people’s attitudes there. It seems so alien to me. I mean, I’ve met traders before, but in their own environment — everyone’s extremely happy, which is not what I expected. It doesn’t seem stressful at all. They were all excited about seeing who was going to ring the bell this morning. They had the American gymnastics team closing it that day. It looks like a really fun place to work.

When asked about how well Rob and Cronenberg have gotten along during this publicity tour, Cronenberg responds, “we were Tweedledum and Tweedledee.” I think I can speak for everyone when I say that a Cronenberg film is not the most commercialized piece of film. Therefore, his fan base tends to be a bit off-kilter. Rob comments on the interesting mix of Cronenberg’s horror fans and his own Twilight fans:

Pattinson: Absolutely. We were in London and we did a Q&A and it was two very diverse groups of people who suddenly came into contact with each other for I think probably the first time. And, I don’t know . . . David’s horror film fans . . . and general “Twilight” female fans . . . are actually quite a good pairing. I think both of them didn’t see anything in each other first of all, but they’re quite a good, odd couple. When you see a bearded guy with long hair, who absolutely will weep [for Cronenberg] . . . and then a “Twilight” fan who will weep at that, they actually look like a couple.

Read the full article here.

Source: The Boston Globe | via RPLife

Rob’s Interview w/ the Miami Herald

Rob talks about how he acquired the role as Eric Packer in Cosmopolis, saying that:

“I got the script out of the blue and was offered the role, which was a little shocking. Usually, the movies I am offered straight-up are terrible. This script felt so original, it was almost gleaming. I knew there was a movie to be made here. I was just worried that I might not be the one to pull it off. I kept thinking ‘There are tons of people better than me for this job!’ It took me a while to make peace with that.”

Rob further comments about how nerve-wrecking it was when he first began filming:

“At the start of the movie, I am wearing this dark, blank suit. I am wearing completely blacked-out sunglasses and I’m standing still, not moving. Every tool actors use for their performance has been taken away from me, but I felt secure because I knew David was watching me — really watching me — and that gives you confidence. Most of the time on movie sets, I question whether the director is even paying attention to what I’m doing.”

The dialogue in Cosmopolis is poetic. The way sentences are put together and how the words just fall off of your tongue so calculated are beautifully translated on screen. Rob commented on how he felt liberated by this syntax:

“I felt a physical connection with the writing — I thought it was so good — and I wanted to read it aloud as soon as I got the script, just to see how it sounded. It is so perfectly written. I loved the fact that I didn’t need to put my personal stamp on it as an actor. I just had to perform it in the truest way possible.”

Read the full article here.

Source: Miami Herald

Cronenberg Praises Rob in ‘Cosmopolis’ w/ IndieWire

Anne Thompson: Why did you cast “Twilight” star Robert Pattinson as your ice-cold 28-year-old Master of the Universe?
David Cronenberg: Of course you begin with the basics. Is he the right age for the character? Does he feel convincing as a screen presence? Obviously you need someone with charisma to hold the audience for the entire movie. He’s in every scene without exception, that’s unusual. You want someone proven, who people want to watch, who will never be boring. I knew I would be crawling all over his face for the entire movie, so I wanted someone whose face is constantly changing, through all the angles. And he had to have chops for tricky dialogue. The art of casting is to intuit, to see from what he’s done before that he could do this.

Was there a particular performance that gave you confidence?
I saw him in “Little Ashes” as the young Salvador Dali. He does a Spanish accent, he was not afraid to play a character of ambiguous sexuality and eccentricity. That probably of all the things I saw made me think he was the right guy.

Did you cast Pattinson with a certain likeability factor in mind, so that audiences would like him in spite of the character he is playing? Feel some vulnerablity?
I really don’t care. I want the lead character in a movie to be interesting, fascinating and complex, but to be likeable to me is way down the list. It’s not on the list, because it is a simplistic thing for the lead character to must be likable. He has to be watchable, that’s the key, and fascinating, and likeable if it works for the project, fine, let him be likeable. If not I don’t worry about it.

There are actors who do not want to play unlikeable characters, afraid it will damage their credibility as stars or effect them personally. Actors who are more interested in being actors than stars, like Viggo Mortensen, don’t worry about being likeable or not on screen.

How did Pattinson surprise you? 
He literally surprised me every day, as he read dialogue and interacted with the other actors. We were throwing different factors at him almost very day because of the stucture of the screenplay. He really has extended scenes. With one actor at the end, Paul Giamatti, he really let it fly, in that he didn’t cling to a preconceived idea of what he should be doing. He reacted spontaneously to other actors as they surprised him and he surprised them. He was terrific and not predictable and dead-on accurate.

How many takes do you do?
One or two. The whole last shot was a long take with Giamatti, three minutes in that last 22-minute scene.

Read the full interview here.

Thanks to RPLife
Source: Indiewire

Rob Talks to the Associated Press About Cosmopolis, Moving On, & More

Rob comments on how be obtained the role of Eric Packer in Cosmopolis:

“Out of the blue,” he says. Pattinson, having never met or spoken to Cronenberg, did a little research: He looked him up on Rotten Tomatoes “and it was like 98 percent approval,” he says.

“It was like: OK, that’s my next job,” says Pattinson.

Further into the interview, Rob talks about how intimidating it was to take such a different dialogue style. DeLillo is known for this odd flow in his work.

The stylized language and atypical nature of the film made it a risky and intimidating choice for Pattinson.

“I couldn’t hear the voice of the character at all. There was nothing,” he says. “It was scary to say yes to something which you didn’t know what it was. I knew it was interesting, I knew there was something special but I had no idea how to do it or what I could add to it. But when you start saying no to Cronenberg because you don’t think it’s good enough, it’s a stupid decision to make.”

Cronenberg commented on the business perspective on casting Rob as the lead in Cosmopolis, 

“The fact that somebody who has clout is willing to do a movie that’s difficult is a gift to a director because you’re not only getting the right guy as an actor, but you’re getting financing interest and you get to make the movie. This is not an easy movie to get made.”

Rob talks about moving on from Twilight, focusing on whether this new freedom has allowed him to explore is acting talent:

Asked if he now feels certain he’s an actor, he quickly replies, “No. As soon as you start existing in a certain world, you feel like you have tremendous amount of baggage all the time. You get stuck in this rut where you want people to think you’re something else, but you’re too scared to do what that is to actually be the other person. Then you get a gift like this movie where it’s way easier than I thought it was. You just do it. It doesn’t really matter if you fail.”

Read the article in its entirety here.

Thanks to RPLife
Source: The Washington Times