New Pictures from the Balenciaga Press Junket & New Interview with Refinery29

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If there’s anyone in Hollywood who has mastered looking effortlessly cool, it’s Kristen Stewart. From her tossed-just-so strands to her artfully smudged liner, the girl is just the embodiment of IDGAF cool. Nowhere is that more evident than in her latest ads for Balenciaga, where the actress poses seminude in the brand’s visuals for its newest perfume, Rosabotanica. Centered around a heart of “spicy vegetal rose,” the scent features citrus, green fig leaves, and white wood accords for a modern, feminine, and very sexy fragrance.

We sat down to talk with Stewart about her role with Balenciaga and yes, those sultry photos. Dressed in head-to-toe Spring 2014 Balenciaga — including the most insanely gorgeous rose-gold cuff/work of art — Stewart was frank, candid, and totally down to dish. Besides letting those gossip sites know what she really thinks about clickbait headlines, Stewart also dished on everything from her undying love of dry shampoo to her thoughts on mastering effortless style. She also shared her secret to the smudged-just-right liner look. Hint: It doesn’t involve a billion makeup brushes and some crazy-complicated 10-step technique.

What do you love best about working with a brand like Balenciaga?
“If I wasn’t in the position that I’m in, I don’t think that I’d be able to find these sides of myself. I’m a pretty basic, practical dresser. But, you know at the same time when I go to an event or participate in a photo shoot or am involved with something like this, it can really make me aware that I have those things in me somewhere.

“I have no creative involvement in this whatsoever. But, the reason I’m into this is that I get to stand by and watch people who are really good at what they do and who really do what they do because it’s the love of their lives; it’s the art that they make. It’s not about a product — a lot of fashion can seem business oriented. And, this just has always felt really organic and in a really cool way, really compulsive.

“Nicolas [Ghesquière] always gave me that impression and then asked me to do this with him. I really appreciated being thrown into his world. Not everyone has such an elaborate story or idea behind their fragrance. It’s just like it smells nice or it’s a beautiful picture. And, that’s cool, too, but this was just a little bit more intriguing.”

We’ve got to talk about the ads — they’re a bit revealing. Did you have any trepidation or nervousness about being exposed like that?
“No, it’s funny. The concept was never centered around any naked idea. It was always like we want to have something really simple, and we like the character that we had in mind who was this wide-eyed, young, fresh girl in this sort of extreme environment and seeing how she copes with those elements.

“This idea was seeing that she is stripped down a bit but like much more conditioned and sort of one with the environment. And, it’s sort of grown into her, and she’s grown into it. [It's] the idea of making it all about the imagery and all about the idea of a fragrance rather than the clothes, because as soon as you put something [on], it’s a little distracting. It was never about my body, it was just about like, face. It’s just so weird… But, do you know why? [Website] clicks. I mean straight up — that’s so obvious.”

You have this great, effortless look about you. Do you have any sort of beauty secrets to getting that kind of easy, low-maintenance glam?
“It’s funny — really the only way to look like you’re not trying is to genuinely not. But…specifically, I guess dry shampoo is a godsend.”

Do you have a favorite?
“I like Bumble and bumble. I like the loose powder, I don’t like the spray. I think just staying healthy, because if you want to look thrown together and you don’t want to try, I think it’s, you know, drink a lot of water, get sleep, and then you can have a sort of rolled-out-of-bed look without looking awful.”

What about your personal style? Any tips to low-maintenance chic dressing?
“I’m such an L.A. kid. I always forget to wear socks — I’ll be outside, like, ‘Oh my god, I’m freezing!’ I feel so un-chic. I feel like that’s kind of my thing. Like, ‘Oh, whatever, I’m gonna go to Paris, but I’m not gonna change my T-shirt.’ But, I don’t really approach it too much in my daily life. I have things that I gravitate towards, like I like things to look worn in… I don’t really put too much thought into it.”

One thing we’ve been loving lately about the red carpet is how we’ve moved away from this cookie-cutter notion of beauty — tanned, blonde, glamour waves, red lips — and are starting to see much more celebration of unconventional beauty. What are your thoughts on that?
“I think it’s awesome. As soon as you start viewing all of this as anything more than just something fun and creative to do, and you feel like there are notes you have to hit to satisfy a certain thing, then why are you even doing it? You should be driven by something that you admire. You should be driven by impulses that are, you know, like experimentation. You should mess with things and find it naturally rather than trying to create this product.

“I feel bad for people who feel like they operate from this place of fear when you really should be risky and make mistakes. The happy mistake is always the one that’s the best, when you go, ‘Whoa, that is just different. I’ve never seen that, and she is rocking it.’ I’d rather be around people that love what they do and that are really good and really artistic rather than, like, technically pretty looks. Pretty is never what you want to go for.”

If you could do anything with your hair, not for a role but just for you personally, what would you do?
“I would like to chop it sometime soon. Everyone’s doing that, but it must feel really good. I had short hair when I was younger, and then it took me sort of so long to get to this point, I’ve held on to it. But, I would love to have a very straightforward boy cut… Everyone’s short hair looks great. I like the trend a lot, but there’s a cute aspect that I would like to get rid of and, like, have a dude’s haircut.”

Like an androgynous cut or straight-up “boy” hair?
“Straight up like a guy’s haircut.”

Would you consider doing a shaved sides thing like Natalie Dormer?
“I love that look. I like a buzz with long [hair]. I think it’d look great like that. Yeah, I would do that. I’m really into different looks. I need to keep slightly neutral because I always fear that I’m gonna sign on to a project, and I’m not going to be in a position to look how I want to look. So, I’m always a little bit scared to go extreme, but I love extreme.”

Your signature look with your hair is that whole no-part, swept-back thing. Is that a look you had to cultivate or did it just kind of happen?
“That’s totally how I’m more comfortable. I think center parts are awesome. They look great on a lot of people. But, there’s a rigidity to it that makes me a little uncomfortable. I really like to be able to move around, and if you just texture your hair right, you can do anything and you don’t have to worry about it. I just had a center part in a movie that I did. It was really hard for me to keep it all day, too. I was just constantly wanting to be like, ‘Ugh!’”

You look really fantastic with a smoky eye, and you do it really confidently. You’ve managed to just nail it where a lot of people just can’t get it. What draws you to that look?
“Probably that I don’t wear a whole lot of makeup when I’m not working. So, when I do, I like to really push it. And, also it’s that same thing: If you’re going to do something, if you’re going to work with a makeup artist, I want to work with someone who’s really pushing it and doing bold things and not playing it safe.

“The cool thing about walking a carpet, if you want to reap the benefits, you get to do something that you wouldn’t normally do. So, instead of being like, okay, I’m going to appease these people, I’m going to be pretty — you probably won’t appease that many people if you’re just pretty. Just forget that and have fun with it. I like things looking a little bit more, not just lived in, but like a little messed up, rough around the edges. I don’t mind that.”

Be honest, do you put the eyeliner on and just go to bed and wear it the next day, or do you actually do it and smudge it?
“Oh, both. Definitely, absolutely. I try to wash my face before I go to bed, but I don’t own eye-makeup remover. Not at all.”

How do you get it off?
“I just make sure it’s out from under my eyes and then it looks great. There’s usually maybe one or two things you just have to wipe off. Instant smoky eye.”

Why do you think an element of effortlessness and undoneness is so important to your particular aesthetic?
“It sort of goes along with everything that we’re saying. It’s just not very interesting for me to consume what somebody has decided to give me. I want to notice things myself — when I really admire someone’s style or someone’s work in any way, it’s always things that you’re like, ‘Wow, I wonder if they know how cool that is? I wonder if they are aware how good that song is’ — you know what I mean? It’s typically more interesting if they don’t. Rather than being like, ‘Oh, yeah, I really worked on that, I really thought about it.

“Obviously it really goes along with not being contrived, and in this business, as soon as you start taking credit for things, you’re now denying what makes it so beautiful. Which is that it’s natural; it’s an organic thing, it’s the process. You rely on the process, you have a creative impulse, you follow it. You can’t really take credit for it, it kind of goes through you. So, that’s why, when people sort of look like they don’t give a fuck, it’s cool. It’s just like that’s classic. That’s always going to be cool.”

Source: Refinery29
Via: KStewartFans

Kristen’s Interview w/ NY Mag [Rosabotanica Press Day]

“Kristen, you have a little something in your hair,” one of Kristen Stewart’s people says during our interview in her hotel room, flicking a little piece of fuzz out of her side-parted hair. She turns back to me, mock-yelling. “Thanks a lot! You weren’t going to tell me it was there?” Stewart is nonchalant about the fuzz because 1. Her hair looks glossy and good anyway; and 2. She doesn’t spend much time thinking about beauty. Throughout our interview about her beauty routine and her repeat involvement with Balenciaga as the face of its new fragrance, Rosabotanica, Stewart has to resist the urge to air-quote the word beauty. The Cut talked to Stewart about her preference for puffy faces, gardenias, and hatred for hotel shampoo.

How do you use scent as part of your acting process?

Whenever I encounter a product that I’ve used on a previous movie, it will take me right back. [Snaps.) Sometimes there will be things I can’t use, even though it might work for a beauty regimen or something that works for the character. I’ll literally have to find another product to use.

So, something like really basic dry shampoo. I used it on The Runaways, and Joan uses that as well. I couldn’t use it anymore. I was just too reminiscent. Also certain lotions, and Rosebud, that chapstick in a tub? Rosebud lip salve. I used that on some movie when I was younger and then I used it again. And then it was likeWhoa. It was too much. But with fragrance, no, it’s not a huge part of my process.

What was your first scent memory?

My favorite flower is a gardenia. My grandma had a big gardenia bush. And gardenias aren’t that common. When you find them, it’s always like, Oh, nice. And it’s my favorite flower now too, because of that.

How was the creative process for Florabotanica different than Rosabotanica?

My involvement didn’t change much, to be honest. I get to use it. I have nothing to do with making the fragrance. I just get to stand by and watch people do awesome things. I’m really close with Nicolas [Ghesquière] and this whole story behind it has been really cool. You don’t always find, in fashion, such developed stories. Sometimes it’s a bit more about how something looks, and ends there. Or with fragrance, this is a pretty picture and sells this perfume. This is a little more fun because it is about telling a story. That’s whyI’m into it and why I got into acting.

Florabotanica and Rosabotanica have the same setting. But with Rosabotanica, it’s about someone who has turned from a wide-eyed, yet hungry, fresh, green person. It’s someone who has been in this extreme environment and survived it. She’s grown with it. She’s taken the aspects she’s appreciated out of that environment and ignored the rest. She becomes a part of her environment instead of becoming this Alice in Wonderland type of girl who’s looking around and doesn’t recognize anything. It’s growing on her.

What has surprised you about scent?

Probably that I like it? I was never really a fan of the idea of putting on some synthetic scent. I didn’t like the idea of it. But when I started using it, it became a part of me. It felt natural.

Some perfumes just smell awful. They smell like your grandmother. This one never did to me. I genuinely use Flora all the time. Rosabotanica is a deeper scent to me than Flora. In this one, the rose is pretty strong. It’s [a] muskier fragrance. It’s the nighttime version, more serious. This is vague and kind of silly, but it’s like New York versus L.A. Or night versus day. Or red versus white. It’s the darker version of it.

I saw you got rid of your cornrows.

Yeah, I took those out literally yesterday. They last about a week or so, if you are hard on your hair, which I am. I’ll re-do it at some point. I liked having it. It’s comfortable and keeps my hair out of my face. And I liked the way it looked. But you need to re-do it once a week, or else it will start to look gross. They were fuzzy.

What is your beauty routine like?

I use Proactiv. It works. It’s really good. I’ve used it for a long time. I’m reliant on it. I use their three-step [system]. And I try to moisturize more than I ever had. Apparently, that’s good for you. That’s about it. I drink a lot of water. Like, if you don’t drink water, you look awful. If you do, that’s a huge part of my “beauty” regimen, I guess.

I use mascara, eyeliner, and maybe some concealer. Chapstick. I don’t like color on my lips unless I’m doing full-on.

I don’t do much with my hair. When I’m working, I treat it so often. There’s heat or color on it. When I’m not working, I just like to let it be healthy. I don’t wash it every day. I like to switch up my shampoo. I like Kerastase a lot. I like using, going back and forth, using fully organic. People give me a lot of shampoo and conditioner, so I’m always like, what is that? I don’t always necessarily know what I’m using.

So you’re not using hotel shampoo.

I hate when I forget shampoo and I have to use it. Only because afterwards it feels bone-dry.

Or it feels limp.

Or that. And flat. Totally.

How do you view beauty and your beauty regimen as part of your day-to-day routine?

I’m super lucky because my job allows me to have fun and take things to the extremes. When I’m not working, I have a really basic regimen. I don’t think too much about my clothes [gesturing]. I don’t wear a lot of makeup. I’m always striving to get to the point where I look like I’ve woken up in the last hour. You know that look you get when you’re fresh-faced? You’re a little puffy but looking really good? That’s what I like.

How do you keep that going throughout the day?

I mean. It doesn’t. But that’s okay. I just like it when people look like they’re not trying. And the only way to do that is by not trying.

Source: NYMag

New Rob Interview With WSJ

Talking about Dior Homme in the occasion of the ad finally going to the USA.

Since premiering in Europe last September, Robert Pattinson’s steamy Romain Gavras–directed fragrance commercial for Dior Homme has generated more than 15 million views on YouTube. When the black-and-white short, starring the 27-year-old Twilight-saga heartthrob makes its American television debut in February, during the Olympics, that number should increase exponentially. Pattinson’s steely glances are being repurposed to promote Dior Homme Eau for Men, a fresh new grapefruit and coriander-spiked riff on the heady, iris-laden original scent that hits shelves exclusively in the U.S. in February.

“I like trying to do ambitious things,” says Pattinson. Pairing the Parisian luxury brand with Gavras’s “violent and visceral” approach was his idea. (The director’s infamous 2010 video for M.I.A’s “Born Free” was pulled from YouTube for its graphic content.) “That’s what got me really enthusiastic about the campaign, that [Dior] wasn’t shying away from anything.” Pattinson’s beauty contract has afforded him a few other perks. “I was a brush-your-teeth-and-have-a-shower kind of guy. I can’t tell if it’s because of my association with Dior or because I’m older, but I’ve started moisturizing,” he says, calling out the brand’s Dermo System Repairing Moisturizing Emulsion as his current skin salve of choice. With a tinge of sarcasm, he adds, “It’s been a quite profound change in my life.” As for the fragrance he fronts, Pattinson likes it best in shower-gel form. Other musts include Nudie jeans and “old Hanes T-shirts,” he says. “There are stores that sell these sweat-stained T-shirts for like $80. It’s a weird cult!”

Up next for the British-born star is director David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars—a “darkly comedic Hollywood satire ghost story,” according to Pattinson. He also has projects with Werner Herzog and Anton Corbijn in the works. “This year, I’m trying to see what my niche is.”

Source: The Wall Street Journal

New Kristen Interview With USAToday

Talking about her character and how she prepared for the role of Amy Cole.

PARK CITY, Utah — Kristen Stewart found common ground between herself and the taciturn Guantanamo Bay Marine guard she played in Camp X-Ray, which premiered Friday at the Sundance Film Festival.

“She had aspects that I have and that I really felt,” said Stewart of Pvt. Amy Cole, assigned to guard the detainees held for years at Guantanamo Bay. The film is a fictional story about a friendship that develops between Cole and Ali, a suspected terrorist imprisoned on the U.S. Naval base since shortly after Sept. 11, 2001.

Stewart spoke of portraying someone not so different from herself, presumably in contrast to playing a teenager in love with a vampire in the Twilight movies.

When asked about her experiences filming, she joked: “I forgot how to turn left. I was constantly rotating,” referring to her character doing rounds in a small cellblock, often pushing a cart of library books.

On a more serious note, she spoke of the importance of preparation for the role.

“Rehearsal was very necessary,” she said. “Luckily there’s a lot of material [for research]. There are multiple documentaries we watched. There were memoirs written on both sides of the coin. And then I hung out with this really awesome Marine for three days and learned things in a very accelerated way.”

Among them, how to stand and walk like a Marine.

“He literally showed me how to walk,” said Stewart. “It’s not like a physically strenuous role, but it should be clear I have training — even though I just walk around in circles.”

As key as her ramrod-straight posture was, it also was necessary to delve into her character’s internal state.

“What was important to me was figuring out who she was,” Stewart said.

When asked further about the role, she deferred to her co-star, Payman Maadi, who plays Ali.

“You’re so charismatic,” she said to him.

Maadi cheerfully took the cue. “We rehearsed for like a week. It was just like theater rehearsals for us. We shared a lot of ideas. It was very important to get the vibe.

“We did another thing: Some of us stayed in cells. We asked to be locked up. I stayed there for a couple of hours.”

Added Camp X-Ray writer-director Peter Sattler: “We just left him there.”

Maadi quipped: “I just came out for this. I’ll go back.”

Sattler said he sought to approach the story from a personal, not political, angle.

“I’ve always been attracted to small stories about big things,” Sattler said. “Guantanamo Bay is a weird subject. It is fraught with all sorts of prickly things to tiptoe around. Because there’s so much propaganda surrounding it, from the beginning we really wanted to make a movie that was not propaganda at all, one that didn’t tell you what to think, but just kind of presented a very human story.”

The idea derived from an image he saw in a documentary in which a detainee and a guard were talking about books on a nearby cart.

“I thought, ‘Wow, what if you just did this kind of two-hander, one-room type of movie where these two characters just talk? What would these two people talk about? What would their relationship be like? It seemed like a cool way to address Guantanamo Bay indirectly. It’s not about Guantanamo Bay, but we can still kind of touch on the subject. “

Source: USA Today
Picture: Instagram / latimesevents

New Kristen Interview With EOnline

Talking about what does she like to do in her freetime.

Kristen Stewart Reveals Her Favorite “Dorky” Pastime

If Kristen Stewart wants to give up acting, she may have a career in…professional golf!

“I can spank a golf ball,” Stewart told me today at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival premiere of her new drama Camp X-Ray. “My dad says that. I totally ripped off my dad.”

While she joked that she’s “way too cool” to wear traditional preppy golf attire, Stewart says the sport isn’t new for her. “I started playing when I was younger with [my dad], a dorky activity and hobby,” she said.

In Camp X-Ray, she plays a guard at Guantanamo Bay who becomes friends with one of the prisoners. Lane Garrison, who plays a fellow guard, said golfing helped them unwind after filming the “heavy and intense” film.

“We built a driving range in the prison and I brought like 400 golf balls,” he said. “We would go out there and hit about 100 golf balls. She has an amazing swing.”

“She needs to do a golf movie,” he said. “People will go see it. Maybe make it an action golf movie—golf with vampires.”

Yeah, he went there.

For more my chat with Kristen Stewart, come back to E! Online later on and also check outE! News tonight at 7 p.m. and 11:30 p.m.

Source: EOnline

New Interview of Kristen With LA Times

She is talking about Camp X-Ray and we even got a new BTS photo.

Kstewartfans Camp X-Ray
Kristen Stewart says the Guantanamo-set ‘Camp X-Ray,’ in competition at the Sundance Film Festival, has everything she looks for in a project.

It is, Kristen Stewart agrees, just like falling in love.

“It’s just a very familiar, necessary feeling when you read a script you want to do,” the actress says, coming alive at just the memory. “I’ve gone with my gut, taken a lot of the thinking away, and been very lucky.

“As an artist,” she continues, her energy rising, “If you view what you do as product, you’ll never do anything true to yourself, never do anything you’re proud of. I’ve never thought, ‘My career should go in this direction.’ There’s no way to be tactical for me.”

Stewart got that familiar feeling when she read writer-director Peter Sattler’s script for “Camp X-Ray,” which has its debut Friday as part of the Sundance Film Festival’s dramatic competition.

A quietly involving drama, part character study, part meditation on the nature of shared humanity, “Camp X-Ray” is powered by Stewart’s focused, convincing performance as Cole, a young Army guard at Guantanamo who makes a connection with a prisoner played by Payman Maadi, the star of Iran’s Oscar-winning ”A Separation.”

“It had been two years since I worked, but it wasn’t my choice to take a break,” the 23-year-old actress says, sitting in a Sunset Boulevard conference room a few days before the festival began. “But nothing had given me that compulsion, nothing that made me feel it was meant for me to do.”

Even though “Camp X-Ray” was “a tiny little movie, a million-dollar budget, five-week shooting schedule,” Stewart responded to it at once. “The character seemed so whole to me,” she says, “it was very emotional and a genuine fresh perspective on something current. It had everything I look for in a project.”

Once Stewart committed, she was all in, reading extensively, watching films, talking to people who filled her in on the military mind-set. “I developed a back story for Cole, I know her father, her mother, I can tell you anything about that girl,” she says. “It’s important to be a real person, not a representation.”

Stewart is also always on the lookout for what she calls “footholds, touchstones, little details that communicate to an audience, that make things evident without being heavy-handed.”

To express Cole’s uncertainty, for instance, the character wears tube socks and sandals on a day off, “trying to be cool but missing the mark.” Even more vivid is the way Cole attacks her long hair, forcing it into the most precise bun imaginable.

“She takes her long hair and binds it, oppresses the … out of it,” Stewart says. “These buns are a reflection of the soldier, and Cole’s is perfection. The only moments she feels confident is when she is in uniform.”

Even doing all this work doesn’t stop the pre-production anxiety that is part of Stewart’s experience. Though in person she is aware, lively and engaging, the actress says that “there is a scary thing about signing on to a project that feels ambitious: ‘Can you stand up to it?’ is the fear. I don’t want to ruin a brilliant script. I give a disclaimer to every director I work with: I will do anything, I will jump off buildings, but I don’t know if I will be able to deliver what you want.”

That fiercer than fierce commitment to the part can also manifest itself during production. On “Camp X-Ray” Stewart is processing what happened during the shooting of the film’s climactic emotional scene between guard and prisoner. It was a scene in which director Sattler made the decision to start with costar Maadi’s coverage, with Stewart playing the scene off camera rather than the other way around, which the actress would have preferred.

“I am such a weirdo freak of an actor that I can’t repeat anything, and Maadi has done a lot of theater, he likes to do a scene over and over,” she says. Not having her first reactions on camera “made me hysterical, at the end of the day I sat in the cellblock crying, I was just done. I was so anxious to have that experience. Looking back on it now, it still makes me crazy, I want to bang my head through the table.”

An established independent film actor before she took on the role of Bella Swan, Stewart is relieved to find the frenzy around the ”Twilight” series starting to abate.

“It was crazy, it reached insane levels,” she says, still a bit disbelieving. “People would ask about maintaining that and I said, ‘Everyone take a breath. That is not going to happen.’ There is no way you could ever want to stay at that level.”

Smiling and saying that her “Twilight” experience “has given me a unique perspective on the world, that’s the positive way of looking at it,” Stewart wonders why it is sometimes difficult for others to realize that it was her unmistakable passion for the work and not a zeal for celebrity that led her to acting.

“It’s not easy for people to understand my discomfort with the spotlight, they say, ‘Why would you become an actor if you feel that way?’” Stewart says. “People don’t know what to do with those feelings, they feel you’re ungrateful, and that does kind of kill me.

“You can’t be saying, ‘You’re wrong about me,’ the worst thing is if you remotely sound like you’re complaining. Then you become the misconception.” All you can do, Kristen Stewart realizes, is to continue to do the work, and that’s what she has done.

Source: LA Times
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Q picture: KStewartFans

Interview of Kristen About Equals

Kristen 3

Kristen is talking about what is the movie about and her fears regarding it.

Kristen Stewart has signed on to play the lead in “Like Crazy” director Drake Doremus’ futuristic love story “Equals,” and it’s making her a nervous wreck.

“I can’t believe I agreed to do it,” said the “Twilight” actress about her upcoming role in the sci-fi drama, which also stars Nicholas Hoult of the upcoming “X-Men: Days of Future Past.”

Stewart describes “Equals” as a slightly updated version of the 1956 film “1984,” based on George Orwell’s classic 1949 novel about rebellion in a repressed futuristic society. “Equals” begins filming later this year.

“I’m terrified of it,” said the 23-year-old actress in a recent interview. “Though it’s a movie with a really basic concept, it’s overtly ambitious.”

“In ‘Equals,’ things go wrong because you can’t deny the humanity in everyone,” said Stewart. “It’s the most devastating story.”

Adds Doremus of his sixth film: “It’s about love in a world where love really doesn’t exist anymore.”

Written by Nathan Parker (“Moon”), “Equals” is the first film Doremus will direct that he didn’t write himself.

“I trust Drake’s process and I know we will do something really natural and real,” said Stewart. “But I told Drake, ‘Don’t expect that I am going to be able to do this. It’s too hard.’ But he wouldn’t take ‘no’ for an answer. I’ve given directors disclaimers before, but never this much.”

Jennifer Lawrence, who appeared in 2011′s “Like Crazy,” was one of the first actresses to read Parker’s script. Though the story brought her to tears, she couldn’t see herself in the role, said Doremus.

“It became evident in my head that Nick and Kristen would have great chemistry,” the director said.

“It’s a love story of epic, epic, epic proportion,” added Stewart. “I’m scared.”

This week, the actress heads to the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, where she’ll star in writer-director Peter Sattler’s soldier film “Camp X-Ray.”

Source:  ABCNews