Maps to the Stars in Cahiers Du Cinéma Magazine

New BTS Still and Interview with Cronenberg who mentions Rob

‘Maps to the Stars’ is on the cover of the French Cahiers Du Cinéma Magazine, featuring a long and spoiler-filled interview with David Cronenberg where he mentions Rob a few times and there’s a new behind the scenes still with Rob and Mia.

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Translation of the Rob Mentions

A child kills another near a urinal, it goes a long way … At the same time, the beauty of the movie is that it’s ‘for’ children, to save the children. The character played by Mia Wasikowska is older but behaves like a child. She gathers children.
Yes the main character is the sweetest, most naive, the purest even she’s crazy. She isn’t here to become a star but to solve a family trauma. Jerome’s character played by Robert Pattinson is also a child. He isn’t born in Los Angeles, he comes from Indiana and elsewhere, he believes that he is able to play the game. It’s pathetic, he’ll be destroyed like a child. He’s too vulnerable. He plays the badass people but he doesn’t. At the end, the children are destroyed by monsters. This is the new direction taken by the poem Liberté which was written by Paul Eluard at the time of the Resistance. Here, freedom is death.

Why did you have so much difficulties to make Maps To The Stars ?
My movies are canadian-UK, Canadian-French or Canadian-German coproductions. I had to shoot at least five days in Los Angeles. We couldn’t recreate Hollywood in Toronto, we had to shoot there, it’s so special. We shot twenty four days in Toronto and five in L.A. One of the problems was to find a coproduction allowing to shoot in the States, and therefore spending money in the United States rather than in the coproducing country. And in most coproductions, it’s not possible to have a co writer which isn’t from the coproduction country … There is also the problem of the actors : we were only allowed to have one American actor, and that’s John Cusack. Julianne Moore has a British passport, Mia Wasikowska is Australian with a Polish passport, Robert Pattinson is English. We didn’t manage to find a coproduction eight years ago or five years ago either. And this is the coproduction with Germany which allowed us to get an American screenwriter. And Saïd Ben Saïd joined us. Here is the reality with which I have to deal as an independent director !

In Maps To The Stars, we can feel the light of Los Angeles. At the end, on the terrace of the hospital, the decor is very strange, we can feel the hills behind.
You believed it? This scene is a CGI one! We shot the hills and we put behind the scenes in Toronto. There was nothing around. I know that in Los Angeles, we would see the hills, that’s why I put this background. We did the same the thing in the scene where Mia discovers Rob on set, the Hollywood hills in the background are made in CGI. When people ask me if I like CGI, I say yes: not to create monsters, but to give birth to this kind of atmosphere without anyone noticing it. It’s invisible but it helps to create a certain reality.

Was it a joke to shoot Robert Pattinson as a limo driver after Cosmopolis?
No. Of course, I thought about it, but he loved the idea of being a part of an ensemble, not being the lead actor. So this is a chance … In fact, in the movie, he’s Bruce Wagner, because Bruce was a limo driver for years, and the lead part in his first novel, Force Majeure, is a limo driver. But only a few people saw Cosmopolis, so nobody will think about it. I hope there will be more people going to see Maps To The Stars (laughs)!

Source: scans: therpattzrobertpattinson | translation: mapstothestarsfrance
Via: RPLife (you can read the full interview translation there)

Rob interviews with Detroit News

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His name is Rey and he does not look, talk or act like anybody’s idea of a teen heartthrob.

His teeth are crooked and foul. His hair is a bad bowl-buzzcut. He’s dirty from head to toe, and when he manages to speak, he mumbles disjointed sentences, often repeating them for no good reason.

He certainly bears little resemblance to the world’s most handsome vampire, the perfectly coiffed, sparkly skinned Edward Cullen, hero of the “Twilight” franchise. And yet Rey, the train-wreck at the center of the post-apocalyptic manhunt “The Rover,” is indeed played by the usually dashing Robert Pattinson.

“I generally don’t get picked for these parts,” Pattinson admits on the phone from L.A. “There’s about five actors who seem to have a lock on the weirdos. I’ve never really been perceived to be one of them — up until now maybe.”

How badly did Pattinson want the part? He auditioned for it. Twice.

Understand, this is a guy whose last movie, “Breaking Dawn — Part 2,” earned $829 million worldwide.

But he understood the need for an audition.

“Well, it’s very different from who I am, personally. There’s no way of really proving that I could have done it by just talking about it,” he says. “It would have been a giant leap of faith.”

Pattinson, 28, saw the jittery, perpetually insecure Rey as a literal underdog.

“In a pack of dogs there’s always one who will completely accept the beta position,” he says.

To help him find the right mindset, director David Michod had Pattinson watch the documentary “Bully,” which follows the lives of kids who are constantly picked on. The actor understood right away.

“People have been accusing you of having something wrong with you for so long that you believe it,” he says. “No one’s expecting anything from you, you stop thinking, you’re a dependent. You don’t have any choice. Really, the only thing he feels is fear of everything.”

It helped that co-star Guy Pearce happens to be a fairly imposing presence.

“Guy’s just got this constant pressure on you in a scene. And he’s got such a singular focus that you kind of end up just falling to pieces,” Pattinson says. “It’s like you’ve got a laser beam on you.”

Pattinson certainly has experience with bright lights. Born and raised in London, he started working in amateur theater at age 15. An agent spotted him there and by 2005 he had landed a small part in “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

By 2008 he’d been chosen to play Edward Cullen in the “Twilight” series. Five movies and countless magazine and tabloid covers later, the franchise concluded last year with “Breaking Dawn — Part 2,” having earned more than $3.3 billion.

Pattinson has learned to adapt to the spotlight over the years, and he even ventures out into public on occasion these days.

“You sort of weigh up what you want your day to be. If you say my friends are going to a movie or whatever and if you go you’re probably going to get a bunch of photographs taken of you,” he says. “Sometimes you’re cool with it, other times I don’t want to be bothered to deal with the stress of it. But I’ve definitely figured out a more balanced way to live than four years ago.”

Along with celebrity, “Twilight” brought Pattinson high visibility within the film world, and he’s been working with some of the most respected people around. He did “Cosmopolis” with director David Cronenberg in 2012 and stars in Cronenberg’s upcoming “Maps to the Stars.” He’s playing T.E. Lawrence in director Werner Herzog’s “Queen of the Desert,” alongside Nicole Kidman and James Franco, and has “Idol’s Eye,” with Robert De Niro and Rachel Weisz, coming up.

Pattinson says “Twilight” probably gave him a boost with his peers, but he’s not sure how much of one. “Within the industry, lots of people I work with, none of them have seen ‘Twilight’ — but then Werner Herzog loves ‘Twilight’!” he says. “I think it’s helped me out in a lot of ways. You have to kind of figure out how to ride the wave afterward.”

And he wants to keep riding that wave, chasing the acting high.

“I guess I was a relatively shy person when I was younger. I still am kind of. It’s nice to challenge yourself, especially in big emotional scenes with a part you’re not capable of doing. To be able to challenge yourself in that way, it’s quite exhilarating,” Pattinson says.

“Especially when it goes right,” he adds. “It could be the worst thing ever.”

Source: Detroit News